Understanding the Difference Between Worker’s Compensation Law and Personal Injury Law

Injuries can cause significant harm and result in financial and emotional damages. When you’re injured as a result of someone else’s neglect, you’re entitled to compensation for the damages you’ve suffered.

But many people are still confused about what they have coming to them when filing a worker’s compensation or personal injury claim. Understanding the two will ensure that you obtain the proper legal representation and receive your fair settlement.

Worker’s Compensation Law

You’re entitled to worker’s compensation when you’re injured on the job. Although there are some exceptions, injured employees are provided benefits to protect them from the damages resulting from an injury.

Worker’s compensation law is unique in that an individual or business does not have to be at fault in order for you to obtain its benefits. In addition, if you were negligent in your injury, you can still get compensation benefits under your worker’s compensation agreement.

You should also consider the fact that worker’s compensation does not include any claims related to pain or suffering on your part. Only claims related to compensation, medical bills, and permanent impairment are included under worker’s compensation law.

Typically, employees who receive worker’s compensation aren’t able to file a lawsuit against their employers or co-workers as a condition of receiving benefits.

Personal Injury Law

A personal injury claim differs in many ways from worker’s compensation. In order to receive compensation through a personal injury claim, you must prove that another individual was at fault through negligence.

Being injured on a given property, for example, does not necessarily indicate that the owner or management of the property should be held liable. The same applies to automobile accidents, in which you must prove that the other driver was at fault.

Personal injury claims can include any and all damages that you believe you have suffered as a result of the incident.
Pain and suffering are considered in a personal injury case along with current and future medical expenses, lost wages and earning ability, permanent damage, and the loss of life enjoyment.

What to Consider With Worker’s Compensation and Personal Injury Law

Worker’s compensation helps employees obtain an income when they’re unable to return to their jobs due to an injury. It provides a valuable backup plan that provides greater security in your employment and financial wellbeing.
Personal injury claims let you aggressively pursue a larger settlement and compensate for all of the areas of your life that have been impacted.

But these benefits aren’t guaranteed in a personal injury claim. Having a skilled attorney to represent you increases the likelihood of achieving a satisfactory outcome.

Worker’s compensation is guaranteed, but it may be much smaller when compared to the results that can be achieved in a personal injury claim. In some cases, a personal injury claim may be filed alongside a worker’s compensation claim if there’s a chance that the worker’s compensation is denied.

The requirements related to fault and compensation are the biggest differences between worker’s compensation and personal injury law.

Consulting with a qualified attorney will provide you with the information and resources you need to get what’s rightfully yours and reclaim your life after an injury.

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